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S818207

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Jaguar XK120, XK140 & XK150 photo

90 more photos below

Record Creation: Entered on 5 August 2022.

Originality: Noted for being in "original condition"

 

Photos of S818207

Click slide for larger image. This car has 91 photos. (Dates are when image was uploaded.)

Exterior Photos (22)

Uploaded August 2022:

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Uploaded January 2021:

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Uploaded February 2020:

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Interior Photos (2)

Uploaded August 2022:

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Details Photos: Exterior (26)

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Uploaded January 2021:

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Uploaded February 2020:

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Detail Photos: Interior (27)

Uploaded August 2022:

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Uploaded January 2021:

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Detail Photos: Engine (8)

Uploaded August 2022:

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Detail Photos: Other (6)

Uploaded August 2022:

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Uploaded January 2021:

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2019-11-01 04:52:22 | Reno writes:

private sale: www.hemmings.com/classifieds/cars-for-sale/jaguar/xk-140se/2325033.html

Description: 1957 Jaguar XK-140SE DHC, The original owner is believed to be Briggs Cunningham famous car racer, collector and car builder. An appraisal from Chicago 1996 proves it and my telephone conversations with Lady Cunningham from 1990 confirmed it by her personally after I identified to her car combination and the model.

I owned the car for over 23 years and decided to offer it for sale.

It is matching number car and it is a SE - special edition model with an extra 20HP motor, wire wheels, and racing headlamps etc.

The car runs presently but due to breaks condition and exhaust, it is not road worthy. So I am selling it As is where is, my warehouse in Oregon where the car was stored since mid-1990s

Please contact me for more details, copies of documents and all questions you might have.

2020-02-01 07:53:49 | pauls writes:

Car on BAT:

bringatrailer.com/listing/1957-jaguar-xk140-dhc-2/_source=dailymail&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2020-02-01

Seller's description:

Lot #27799

Seller: Brankol

Location: Hillsboro, Oregon 97123

Chassis: G647385

76k Miles Shown, TMU

3.4-Liter Inline-Six

4-Speed Manual Transmission

Red with Black Soft Top

Black Interior

Red Wire Wheels

Spare Cylinder Head

Stored in 1992

Started in Nov 2019, After 27 Years

Private Party or Dealer: Private Party

This 1957 Jaguar XK140 SE Drophead Coupe was acquired by the seller in 1992 from a neighbor in Illinois. The fuel tank was removed and cleaned at that point but never installed, and the car has been stored for the past 27 years. Paperwork indicates that the car was previously owned and raced in Europe by the family of Briggs Cunningham, an American entrepreneur who modified and raced ’50s Jaguars, yachts, and more. The bodywork has been refinished in red with a black soft top, while the black interior has sustained damage from rodents, and the carpet has been removed. The engine bay is equipped with a 3.4-liter inline-six paired with a four-speed manual transmission, and the seller reports that the engine was started in November 2019 for the first time since being stored in the early ’90s. This XK140 convertible is now offered with some records and paperwork, an SE cylinder head, and a clean Oregon title in the seller’s name.

The exterior has been refinished in red with a black soft top. The paintwork and exterior includs chips in the finish noted by the seller.

Red wire wheels are mounted with BFGoodrich Silvertown whitewall tires. The seller notes that the insert for the spare tire was damaged by rust and has been discarded.

The interior features individual bucket seats with black upholstery over painted metal flooring that shows wear. Black door cards feature stowage pockets and wooden cappings. The seller reports that the seats have been damaged by rodents and that rust in the trunk has been cut out. The trunk area and other interior details can be seen in the gallery.

A factory four-spoke steering wheel sits in front of a wooden dashboard with Smiths instrumentation including an analog clock, a 6k-rpm tachometer, and a 140-mph speedometer. The five-digit odometer shows 76k miles, and true mileage is unknown.

The 3.4-liter DOHC inline-six is equipped with dual SU carburetors and a C-type cylinder head. The seller reports that the engine ran in 1992, after which point the fuel tank was removed and professionally cleaned. The engine was then started again in November 2019 after 27 years of storage. A spare SE cylinder head will accompany the sale and is shown in the gallery below.

The engine is paired with a four-speed manual transmission and a solid rear axle. Additional photos of the underside are presented in the gallery.

The data plate shown above lists the original chassis, body, and powertrain numbers. The S suffix on the engine number indicates the fitment of special equipment. The Oregon title and the previous title both list the engine number as the car’s identification number, with a 5 instead of an S.

An evaluation from 1995 states that the car was owned by Briggs Cunningham and raced in Europe in the 1950s.

2020-02-08 09:50:53 | Capt RD writes:

Bid To $45,000 On 2/7/20

Reserve Not Met -- Bring a Trailer online auction

2021-01-07 08:55:43 | pauls writes:

Car to be at auction 1/21

worldwideauctioneers.com/listings/scottsdale21/1956-jaguar-xk140-drophead-coupe/

Auction description:

Lot 24

1956 Jaguar XK140 MC Drophead Coupé

The Ex-Briggs Cunningham

CHASSIS NO: S818207

• Certified by Cunningham Motorsports Historian as a Former Briggs Cunningham race car

• Raced by Briggs and continually raced by famed journalist Denise McCluggage

• Matching numbers car

• Rare piece of history and believed to be all-original

Documents

Race log - Cunningham XK140 MC DHC.pdf

3.4-litre DOHC straight six-cylinder engine, double SU H6 carburetors, four-speed manual gearbox, front suspension transverse wishbones with torsion bars, rear rigid axle with semi-elliptic leaf springs, rack and pinion steering; wheelbase: 102”

This 1956 Jaguar XK140 Drophead Coupé possesses legendary American racing history. Purchased new by Briggs Cunningham and raced by Briggs as well as famed lady journalist and racer Denise McCluggage, this may be the unexpected find of the decade. It had been sitting in a garage for almost 30 years when the current owner found the long-lost car and gave it a careful tune up. Presented here in what is believed to be all-original condition, it brings with it not just well-earned patina, but early American SCCA racing pedigree.

The Drophead Coupé model, presented here, offered a sturdier canvas top that stowed behind the seat, a fixed windscreen, side windows and a small backseat as well as a walnut-veneered dashboard and door trim that reminded the driver they were in the lap of British luxury as well as behind the wheel of a racer. This particular MC (SC, special equipment in the UK) boasted a 3,442 cc, dual overhead cam, straight six-cylinder engine, which breathed through double SU H6 carburetors and was undeniably formidable on the blacktop.

During this period, Briggs Swift Cunningham became a Jaguar dealer and also purchased his first batch of Jaguars for his racing team. This car was actually among that first batch. Heir to the Swift meatpacking family, Briggs was independently wealthy and had an unquenchable thirst for sports. He was well-known, not just for his own exploits, but for launching careers and backing people he believed in, and Denise McCluggage was one of the lucky, albeit worthy, recipients of his generosity. McCluggage isn’t merely famous because she was a female journalist-turned-racer. She is celebrated because she was one of the true great car journalists in history and a seriously talented driver. The only journalist to ever be inducted into the Automotive Hall of Fame, she garnered countless awards and was founder of what would become AutoWeek. Early in her career, McCluggage, working as a sportswriter, was on assignment at a Yacht Club in Connecticut when she met Briggs scooping ice cream for the kids. A friendship was forged, and the legendary journalist got her true start in racing. Among the most famous of Denise’s cars was a XK140 Drophead Coupé. This legendary Jaguar was the second competition car Denise McCluggage continually raced for Briggs in the SCCA and photographs of her with the car are included in the sale.

This particular Jaguar, chassis number S818207, was certified by Cunningham Motorsports Historian, Lawrence Berman, to be the original XK140 Briggs raced at Beverly Airport in 1956. Records show the car was raced there by Briggs then officially raced six more times on record by Denise McCluggage, which led to a first-place class C victory at Montgomery Airport in New York on August 19, 1956. This well-known piece of history was thought to have been lost to time by a myriad of Briggs and McCluggage enthusiasts until the current owner uncovered it in a garage. So, the story goes, Briggs held onto the Jaguar for a few years. Around the time McCluggage moved on to a Porsche, Briggs sold the XK to a close friend who kept it and stored it properly until he was elderly. He then sold it to a gentleman who let it sit in his garage for almost three decades. When the current owner uncovered this legendary Jag, he put it through a gentle but thorough tune up but left the presumed all-original car unaltered. In seeking certification by Lawrence Berman, the tell-tale sign for him was the pedals. Briggs chief mechanic, Alfred Momo, always bent Briggs’ cars’ pedals in a specific way to enable easier toe-heeling while racing. When the bent pedals were confirmed, all the pieces to the puzzle began to fit.

So, here it is at last, Denise McCluggage’s long-lost Briggs Jaguar. She spoke of it in numerous interviews and the car existed in photographs, but it wasn’t until a lucky twist of fate that it was uncovered, sleeping in a California garage. This numbers-matching piece of history appears to be all-original; it has matching chassis and engine numbers, a nod from the Cunningham Motorsports Historian and all the glorious patina that this storied racer has earned. This rare car presents an even rarer opportunity.

2022-08-05 10:06:25 | pauls writes:

Car to return to auction 9/22

worldwideauctioneers.com/listings/auburn-auction-2022/1956-jaguar-xk140-mc-dhc/

Auction description:

1956 Jaguar XK140 MC DHC

Lot 633

The Ex-Briggs Cunningham Team Car, Denise McCluggage Race Winner

CHASSIS NO: S818207

• Famed auto journalist and racer, Denise McCluggage won her 1st race in this car

• Recently featured at the Motorsports Hall of Fame upon McCluggage’s 2022 induction

• Given to McCluggage by celebrated sportsman and her race team sponsor, Briggs Cunningham

• Backed by Cunningham Motorsports’ Historian, this historic car is a surviving example with certified history and period photos

1956 Jaguar XK140 MC DHC

How often do you have a chance to purchase a historic race car that was owned and raced by two people who are in a combined six Halls of Fame, so important was their impact on the national and international motorsports world. A flurry of media coverage surrounded the resurfacing of this Jaguar in dozens of classic car trade magazines internationally like Road & Track and Autoweek as well as some TV coverage.

American sportsman Briggs Cunningham was indisputably one of the most pivotal figures in post-war sports car racing, making a profound impact as a driver, team owner and constructor. His contributions to both motor racing and competitive sailing eventually led into his induction in the Motorsports Hall of Fame of America, the International Motorsports Hall of Fame, and the America's Cup Hall of Fame. The famed Alfred Momo managed the Cunningham racing team, at various times fielding such accomplished drivers as Jack Brabham, Luigi Chinetti, Bob Grossman, Dan Gurney, Duncan Hamilton, Walt Hansgen, Mike Hawthorn, Phil Hill, Ed Hugus, Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Augie Pabst, Roger Penske, Roy Salvadori and of course, Denise McCluggage.

Briggs chose to close his sports car company in 1955, thereafter racing almost exclusively in foreign makes. This decision coincided with an agreement with Coventry to become the director of Jaguar Cars, New York, the marque's East Coast distributorship, which facilitated Cunningham's purchase of a D-Type and several racing XKs over the next few years, this being one of those which he raced personally.

A recent highlight at the 2022 Motorsports Hall of Fame induction in Daytona Beach, this 1956 Jaguar XK140 caused quite a stir. Hall of Fame inductee, Denise McCluggage, won her first race in this terrific red Jag. Believed to have been lost to the sands of time, this XK was often referenced with extreme fondness by McCluggage in interviews and was discovered a couple of years after her passing at the age of 88. Denise was not only an accomplished, and quite famous, racecar driver, she was one of the greatest automobile journalists to ever put pen to paper. She brought racing and automotive coverage to the New York Herald and was the first female journalist to cover the famed Indy 500 where she had to do her interviews from outside the fence of gasoline alley as women were forbidden inside. Although quite qualified, she was forbidden to race at Le Mans as well as they steadfastly refused to allow a woman driver. She took her Competition Press and became one of the founders of Autoweek, where she remained her entire career, and here in Auburn is her long-lost Jaguar.

McCluggage was akin to Ernest Hemingway in that she physically did whatever she wrote about. When she was covering the sport of skiing, she skied. When she began covering motorsports, she raced. McCluggage was already working sporting events at the New York Herald when she struck up a friendship with famed American sportsman, Briggs Cunningham, at a Connecticut Yacht Club. She was there covering the race and Briggs was scooping ice cream for the kids. Shortly thereafter, McCluggage was racing with Briggs as her sponsor. This car, chassis number S818207, is the car Briggs assigned to Denise. She raced it well and often, most famously at the SCCA race at New York’s Montgomery Airport where she secured a first-place class C victory on August 19, 1956. Denise McCluggage would go on to race many cars around the world, but she always referenced this 1956 XK140 Jaguar as a special touchstone in her illustrious career. She practically established the motorsports genre in print journalism. She brought automotive coverage to the New York Herald and the races of Indy 500, Le Mans, Grand Prix, and countless others to Autoweek. Back when women weren’t allowed in the Indy 500’s gasoline alley, she would interview her subjects through the fence. Through talent, tenacity, and good-humored charisma, she charted a path that would change the genre of automotive writing. Overstating her importance as a journalist is frankly impossible. She is the only journalist to ever be inducted into the Automotive Hall of Fame. Autoweek continues today because of McCluggage. When she passed away in 2015, her last article for the publication she helped start went to print just five days later. McCluggage’s legacy in her field knows no equal and this car is an important cornerstone of that story. Denise counted as close personal friends everyone from Steve McQueen, Phil Hill, Sterling Moss, Dan Gurney as well as many music and Hollywood personalities.

Shortly after Denise and Briggs’ fortuitous meeting, Briggs opened up a Jaguar dealership and ordered a round of 1956 Jaguar XK140s for his racing team. Chassis number S818207 is one of those Jags.

The current owner discovered “Lady Leadfoot,” as he affectionately calls the car, sleeping in a barn where it had resided for nearly 30 years. It boasts matching numbers and seems to be wholly unaltered since its days on the track. When it came time to vet what was believed to be Denise McCluggage’s famed Jaguar, he looked to Cunningham Motorsports’ Historian, Lawrence Berman. Once Berman had a look at the car’s pedals, he immediately knew. Brigg’s Chief Mechanic, Alfred Momo, always bent the pedals of the Cunningham team cars to allow for improved toe-heeling while racing. This was it. In a short amount of time, he confirmed that this, indeed, was Denise’s long-lost Jag and that it had also been raced by Briggs at Beverly Airport. A true original, just like its storied owner, this legendary Jaguar has been unaltered since its days as a racer and possesses all the glorious patina it has so rightfully earned. An opportunity that is unlikely to surface again, chassis S818207 is such a significant part of American racing history and the journalistic genre that gave it life. This Jaguar has many more places to go and stories to tell in the future.

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